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U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Connor

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics:

what it has data about: Inflation & Prices, Pay & Benefits, Workplace Injuries, Employment & Unemployment, Spending & Time Use, International Programs, Productivity, and Regional Resources. (note these are the nine most reliable topics on the site.  All these can be found in the Subjects tab at the top of the webpage, along with many others within the A to Z index).
what time periods it covers: They keep a database of all of there statistics going further back than before the new millennium (before the year 2000)
what geographical area it covers: All of the geographical information comes from the United States.

for which of Factistan’s issues it has relevant data: Inflation & Prices, Pay & Benefits, Workplace Injuries, Employment & Unemployment, Spending & Time Use, International Programs, Productivity, and Regional Resources

who collected it:  All of the information that is collected has been done by our government
how they collected it: All of the information that BLS provides is done through surveys with several different companies.  All of the companies that take part in these surveys are not given out to the public due to a pledge of confidentiality that the BLS have to uphold.
how they present it: Almost all of the data that the BLS provides is either a visual (like a chart or a graph) or a spreadsheet of data.  Along with this data shown to make the information easier to comprehend, they also give a short summary of what the data is explaining.

Employment- population ratios in October of young people by school enrollment status, 1970-2015

Year Ages 16 to 19 Ages 20 to 24
Enrolled Not enrolled Enrolled Not enrolled
1970 31.50% 58.30% 47.10% 67.60%
1971 31.5 58 46.2 68
1972 32.7 62.2 48 69.8
1973 35.7 64.5 49.6 73
1974 35.2 63.1 51.2 72.4
1975 33.8 58.8 47.2 68.8
1976 34.5 60.4 50.2 70.8
1977 36.8 63.9 50.8 73.3
1978 38.7 66.2 53 75.9
1979 37.8 65.1 52.4 75.3
1980 36.4 62.4 51.3 72.8
1981 34.4 59.9 52 72.6
1982 32.5 55.1 51.3 69.4
1983 32.3 57 50.8 71.5
1984 34.2 59.7 52.9 74.4
1985 34.7 58.8 55.3 75.1
1986 36.6 61.6 54.7 75.8
1987 37.5 60.8 56.6 76.8
1988 37.9 63.5 59.4 77
1989 40.2 63 57.2 76
1990 36 61.7 56.6 75.8
1991 35.7 54.7 56.4 73
1992 34.8 56.8 56.2 73.6
1993 34.4 59 57.4 74.7
1994 38.1 57.1 60.2 75.1
1995 37 58.4 57 74.1
1996 38.5 56.1 59.2 75.8
1997 36.2 59.9 59.3 77.1
1998 38.6 59.6 59.7 78.5
1999 39.3 61.6 58.9 77.5
2000 38.6 63.4 61.6 78.6
2001 35.5 60.5 57.5 76.4
2002 34.2 60.1 56 74.5
2003 30.9 56.6 57.1 74.1
2004 31.5 57.9 58.5 74
2005 31.4 58.3 58.2 75.7
2006 31.8 58.8 55.2 76
2007 30.1 58.3 55.3 74.8
2008 27.6 52.1 54.2 72.7
2009 22.7 43.3 49.5 67.2
2010 22.4 47.8 48.6 68.4
2011 22.8 48.5 51.3 69.5
2012 22.6 47.7 49.8 70.4
2013 22.2 47.9 49.4 69.4
2014 24 52.4 50.4 71.8
2015 23.7 55 47.8 74.4

“In October 2015, 57.0 percent of 16- to 24-year-olds, or 21.9 million young people, were enrolled in high school or college. Among these students, nearly a quarter of 16- to 19-year-olds and nearly half of 20- to 24-year-olds had a job in October. Both figures were about the same as in October 2014 but well below their peaks. Among students ages 16 to 19, 40.2 percent worked in October 1989, compared with 23.7 percent in October 2015. Among students ages 20 to 24, 61.6 percent worked in October 2000, compared with 47.8 percent in October 2015″(Students).

“Young people not enrolled in school were more likely than students to have a job. Among 16- to 19-year-olds, 55.0 percent of those not enrolled in school had a job in October 2015. Among 20- to 24-year-olds, 74.4 percent of those not enrolled in school had a job”(Students).

how to use the web: All information within the website can be found in the A to Z index, while the better, and more reliable data can be found in the Subjects and Data Tools tags (I recommend the Subjects tag, because it shows the nine main topics on the site).

how to cite the data source: MLA, APA, HTML (exposed URL)

https://www.bls.gov/

“Students less likely to work in October 2015 than in the 1980s and 1990s.” Bureau of Labor Statistics, United States Department of Labor, www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2016/students-less-likely-to-work-in-october-2015-than-in-the-1980s-and-1990s.htm. Accessed 9 Feb. 2017. (MLA)