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The Course

Medaille College
Agassiz Circle
Buffalo, New York 14214

Syllabus

Course Number and Title ENG 200 Analytical Writing

CRN 20198 Section 03 Tuesday, Thursday 12:45 – 2:10 in M310

CRN 20203 Section 09 Tuesday, Thursday 2:20 – 3:45 in H216

Semester Spring 2017
Number of Credits 3
Prerequisite ENG 110 or its equivalent in transfer credits

Instructor Douglas Anderson

Office Main 204
Hours Monday and Wednesday 3-4, 5:30-6 and Tuesday and Thursday 1 – 2 and by appointment

I have several email addresses, but I would appreciate it if you sent all mail related to this course to me at eng200s17 at gmail.com

Please note: Grading of student papers will reflect standard English usage. The MLA and APA bibliographic styles are generally used at Medaille.

Printer-friendly version of the official Course Syllabus

Catalog Description of Course

This course develops students’ skills in critical thinking and in writing analyses using subject matter from across the curriculum. Each writing assignment requires research and writing from sources. Students will conduct research in both print and digital platforms and will produce effective college writing in multiple media, where appropriate. Students will produce a portfolio of their written work, including a self-assessment.

This course develops students’ skills in critical thinking and in writing analyses using subject matter from across the curriculum. Each writing assignment requires research and writing from sources. Students will conduct research in both print and digital platforms and will produce effective college writing in multiple media, where appropriate. Students will produce a portfolio of their written work, including a self-assessment.

Student Objectives

Learning Outcome: Written and Information Literacy

After completing this course, you will be better able to:

Recognize and apply the elements of essay organization, as needed: introduction and thesis, subtopics, transitions, paragraph structure, and conclusion.

  • Recognize and apply the elements of grammar and punctuation appropriate to advanced college-level writing, as needed: sentence structure, subject-verb agreement, tenses, pronoun usage, parts of speech, commas, apostrophes, colons, semicolons, hyphens, dashes, brackets, and ellipses.
  • Use advanced research strategies and think critically about the pertinence and quality of secondary and primary sources before using them in written work; recognize and use a criteria for choosing quality sources in multiple media.
  • Use discipline-specific documentation styles like MLA, APA, and CSE.
  • Understand analytical models for research writing.
  • Develop a series of written essays on a single theme or a topic or within a disciplinary approach of the instructor’s choice that culminates in a single, long research essay OR another final essay of the instructor’s choice.
  • Learn advanced vocabulary of composition theory/criticism and use it to critique their own and other’s writing within workshops and/or peer editing sessions.
  • Revise and edit as a means of thinking analytically, as needed: refine thesis focus; check for logical continuity and coherency; test supporting evidence; enhance transitions; assess overall organization.
  • Develop ideas and share research sources in small groups (in both traditional and online environments) and utilize these within their individual essays.
  • Assess their own progress as advanced writers within the context of the class, including a written self-assessment and a portfolio of their work. The suggested minimum number of assignments is at least four short (4-6 page) MLA, thesis-driven essays. At least three of these essays should require incorporating research from academic sources.
  • Demonstrate competency in and appropriate etiquette in communication in multimedia and online platforms, including relevant social media.

Whew!

Outline of Course Content

day-by-day syllabus

The topics below are common to very section of ENG 200. How they work out in practice is up to the individual instructor. In boldface are the topics on which I am placing heavy emphasis.

If you are not clear how each of these is playing out in our course, please discuss it with me.

  • Essay organization: introduction and thesis, subtopics, transitions, paragraph structure, and conclusion
  • Review of rhetorical modes: Argument-Persuasion, Comparison-Contrast, Process Analysis, Definition, Exemplification, Cause-Effect, Narration, Description, and Division-Classification
  • Further development of the identification and use of rhetorical strategies, including use of counter-argument, anti-thesis, or concession-rebuttal strategies
  • Review of grammar and punctuation: sentence structure, subject-verb agreement, tenses, pronoun usage, parts of speech, commas, apostrophes, colons, semicolons, hyphens, dashes, brackets, and ellipses
  • Research: evaluate, interpret, and present primary and secondary data; use advanced library and multimedia resources; use MLA, APA and other documentation formats; avoid plagiarism
  • Paraphrase and summary, as needed
  • Introduction to and development of analytical models in research writing
  • Revision as a means of thinking analytically: emphasis on refining thesis focus; checking for logical continuity and coherency; testing supporting evidence; enhancing transitions; assessing overall organization
  • Workshops and/or peer editing sessions; use of vocabulary specific to composition theory/criticism
  • Collaborative learning in small groups; use of shared research and ideas in individual essays
  • Inductive and deductive reasoning as they apply to problem solving and/or the creation of strong arguments
  • Audience analysis
  • Unities of person, tone, and tense
  • Voice and style
  • The portfolio as a means for self-assessment
  • Relationships of this course to other courses in the curriculum, with a particular emphasis on writing across the curriculum and discipline-specific research documentation styles

Texts

Hacker, Diana. Rules For Writers, 8th edition. New Jersey: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2015.

The rest of the course material is on this course web or linked to it.